Immolation

They came for me as I was grinding the last of the roasted spelt. My sisters stood by with downcast eyes. I did not know who of them believed in my innocence. I found that I was troubled by this. I would go to my death willingly, but I was unwilling to let the ravenous… Continue reading Immolation

Gimme That Ol’ Time Religion

In the last few years I’ve seen a wide variety of people arrive at the conclusion that what we need as a society to avert self-destruction — self and everything else, that is — is a new religion. I’ve encountered sociologists (who might be predisposed), economists (who probably are not), celebrity chefs and actors, personal… Continue reading Gimme That Ol’ Time Religion

May Day

the hawthorn queen she waxes full in fertile grace queen of quick and fay, she reigns in mantle green and seemly face quelling fear and mortal pains eternal mother, ever maid undying wisdom in her glance deathless wierd is on her laid to spin th' unceasing wheel of chance again, she comes in crown of… Continue reading May Day

Ça tourne, Old Man

Metis (Image from GreekMythology.com) Wise Metis, Sea-Dark Metis, Metis of Fair Judgement, Metis lived on the mountain far from her mother. Far, yet near a cold stream that flowed to Tethys whereby they could converse. For Tethys was in all the springing waters. Metis lived in solitude on the mount, desiring none. But in time… Continue reading Ça tourne, Old Man

Legendborn: Review

Legendborn Tracy Deonn Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2020 Legendborn by Tracy Deonn Let me start with the ending. I’ve been selling books for more or less thirty years. I’ve read so many young adult novels, I can tell you how the plot will go just by looking at the liner notes. In fact, I can… Continue reading Legendborn: Review

Is Farming the Problem?

Here is a story that we tell ourselves. From The Good Ancestor: “Consider the immense legacy left by our ancestors: those who sowed the first seeds in Mesopotamia 10,000 years ago, who cleared the land, built the waterways and founded the cities where we now live, who made the scientific discoveries, won the political struggles… Continue reading Is Farming the Problem?

Lion and Lamb

March is upon us once again. An Old English name for March was Hlyda, meaning “loud”, presumably referring to the roaring March winds. This name survived as Lide in the West countries.  Eat leeks in Lide and ramsons in May, And all the year after physicians may play. — proverb from western England Ducks wan't… Continue reading Lion and Lamb

Of Hearts and Wolves

Like many people, I find the American version of Valentine’s Day and the saccharine and monochromatic view of love it promotes to be repulsive. In my younger days I assumed the whole farce was invented by the greeting card and gifting industry, along with the rise of all manner of fake holidays intended to get… Continue reading Of Hearts and Wolves